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Terminal Sonic Resources
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Terminal Sonic Resources
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4 Tracks
Voices recorded on wax eventually scratch and degrade as their medium becomes obsolete, fodder for thrift shoppers, collectors, flea markets, and dusty attics.
It was the electric revolution that made it happen, the disembodiment of sound. The telephone and phonograph, forever divorcing a sound from its moment creation. In the previous 4 billion years you only heard a sound when it was made, only heard a voice with in hearing distance, only listened to music when it was played right before you, never to be replayed the same way again. Before the concept of realtime or playing live was even under consideration, this was the norm of reality. The discovery of electricity broke the chains of temporality, freeing sound from the passage of time, disembodying it, exorcizing it like a ghost now to wander and drift among the mental environments of modern life. Now disembodied sound is ever present, back ground soundtracks to the banal drama of our daily lives: Muzak in the shopping mall, kids strolling past with their ghetto blaster, radio stations, elevator music, tape players, answering machine, micro tapes, the neighbors hifi stereo coming through the walls, your colleague humming a show tune across the office. Constantly recontexutalized to the point of no context at all, except maybe an airbrushed photo in a glamor mag or an over produced video on MTV. But even yet sound does not live forever, instead it is condemned to a slow, sometimes glacially slow death. Voices recorded on wax eventually scratch and degrade as their medium becomes obsolete, fodder for thrift shoppers, collectors, flea markets, and dusty attics. Magnetic tape deteriorates over time into ear splitting shrieks, static and nauseating loops as the plastic warps, is scratched, gets stuck in the machine, or left too long in the sun. Even ditigal recordings are subject to viruses, loss of quality and terminal obsolescence of technology. Everything dies in the end.
Band/artist history
This collective was born in the basements and attic studios of the student housing ghettos of Harrisonburg VA out of a shared desire to delve into the grey areas of sound which inhabit the spaces between chaos and order, harmony and dissonance, atmosphere and driving beats, lo-fi sound collage and crafted songsmanship. Key members Norman Scott and Sherwin Jones met while studying sculpture in the fine arts program at James Madison University and began to meet for discussion and an exchange of ideas, naturally leading to musical collaboration. A frequently contributing participant and English lit. major, Justin Stolzfus, became involved in the project from time to time, bringing off kilter song writing, apocalyptic lyrical rants and skills with a guitar.
Have you performed in front of an audience?
Only when upon consulting lunar astral charts and other archane and nearly forgotten means of divination do we deem that the hour is right and the astral veil is thin enough to call fourth our sonic presence.
Your musical influences
Stock Hausen and Walkman, William Burroughs, Throbbing Gristle, Lab Report, Merzbow, Caberet Voltain, John Cage, Trans Am, Don Limpio, Earth Wind and Fire, Oxnamoon, Henry Mancini, Atari sound tracks, static, digital sludge, the sound of gass leaking from an open oven
What equipment do you use?
Sonic production by any means necessary
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