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Farewell Dear Heart (Verse 4 & 5 Jones 1600 XII
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This is one of the most famous songs of the Shakespearean age. Shakespeare included the song in his 'Twelfth Night'.
Free
Classical - Renaissance
Charts #6 in subgenre today (peak #2)
Previous peak charts position #10
William Shakespeare / Anon. Writer? / Robert Jones
Patrick T. Connolly
May 12, 2018
MP3 3.7 MB
160 kbps bitrate
3:15 minutes
Story behind the song
I did the music to 2 stanza in each of my two takes. Unfortunately there are 5 stanza for the song. For this Take 1, I sang the 4th and 5th stanza. For Take 2, I sang the first and 3rd stanza. I started the 2 takes with guitar on August 17, 2017. I did the keyboard vocal guide on August 26, 2017 for both takes. The keyboard bass for Take 1 was put down on September 17, 2017. The keyboard bass for Take 2 was put down on September 18, 2017. I did the Vocal for both takes on December 26, 2017.
Lyrics
Farewell Dear Heart (Verse 2 [Jones 1600 XII FAREWELL, DEAR LOVE, - by William Shakespeare alone, or with Anon. Writer From William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night or What You Will - Farewell, dear heart, since I must needs be gone. His eyes do show his days are almost done. But I will never die. Sir Toby, there you lie. Shall I bid him go? What an if you do? Shall I bid him go, and spare not? O no, no, no, no, you dare not. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - From Robert Jones Booke (1600) Farewell, dear love, since thou wilt needs be gone, mine eyes do show my life is almost done, nay I will never die, So long as I can spie, there be many mo though that she do go, there be many mo I feare not, why then let her goe I care not. Farewell, farewell, since this I finde is true, I will not spend more time in wooing you: But I will seek elsewhere, If I may find her there, Shall I bid her go, What an if you doe? Shall I bid her go, and spare not, O no, no, no, no, I dare not. Ten thousand times farewell, yet stay a while, Sweet kisse me once, sweet kisses times beguile: I haue no power to moue, How now am I in loue? Wilt thou needs be gone? Go then, all is one, Wilt thou needs be gone? oh hie thee, Nay, stay and doe no more denie mee. Once more farewell, I see loth to depart, Bids oft adew to her that holdes my heart: But seeing I must loose, Thy loue which I did chuse: Go thy waies for me, Since it may not be, Go thy waies for me, but whither? Go, oh but where I may come thither. What shall I doe? my loue is now departed, Shee is as faire as shee is cruell harted: Shee would not be intreated, With praiers oft repeated: If she come no more, Shall I die therefore, If she come no more, what care I? Faith, let her go, or come, or tarry. - Twelfth Night or What You Will Act II, Scene iii. lines 89 - 108. - by William Shakespeare - MALVOLIO Sir Toby, I must be round with you. My lady bade me tell you, that, though she harbours you as her kinsman, she's nothing allied to your disorders. If you can separate yourself and your misdemeanors, you are welcome to the house; if not, an it would please you to take leave of her, she is very willing to bid you farewell. SIR TOBY BELCH 'Farewell, dear heart, since I must needs be gone.' MARIA Nay, good Sir Toby. Clown 'His eyes do show his days are almost done.' MALVOLIO Is't even so? SIR TOBY BELCH 'But I will never die.' Clown Sir Toby, there you lie. MALVOLIO This is much credit to you. SIR TOBY BELCH 'Shall I bid him go?' Clown 'What an if you do?' SIR TOBY BELCH 'Shall I bid him go, and spare not?' Clown 'O no, no, no, no, you dare not.' SIR TOBY BELCH Out o' tune, sir: ye lie. Art any more than a steward? Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?
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