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Reviews
Review #16
Makeshift3 Game Day" is one of the better albums on the Christian Punk scene. The album was released on an Micah Records, an independent label. I really enjoy this album. It is the 3rd release from a band who is going to explode in popularity in the next few months. They are with New School Records and will release a 4th within the next couple of months. Game Day is loaded with inspiring lyrics and a blend of vocals and neat guitar intros. The guys in the band are dedicated to making meaningful Christian punk music. The vocals and lyrics to Game Day are probably what puts the drive in the album. "Nicolatian Mind" stands out:

It's the Lord you have denied
And now you stand before the Healer
One hurt inside
It seems as though the world has crumbled down
And turned into a tragedy
By a Nicolatian mind

Game Day is available on the Internet for less than 5 bucks. Get it, play it, and visit their site at www.makeshift3.com The guys in the band are great and we should thank the Lord for giving us a band that is pure.

---christcore.net 2002
Review #15
Makeshift3: Fuel for Life

Drawing on the musical influences of Blink 182, Strung Out and Pennywise, this trio of Southern Cal guys throw in some lyrics about God, that horrible show based on a zip code, and some stories of the difficulties of living in this society to come up with a sound that is flavorful, fast, fun and furious. These silly fellows must have a lot of fun in rehearsals and shows. Some extra attention could be paid to the vocals, however.

--Sep/Oct 2000 HM Magazine
Review #14
Someone likes those early Strung Out records. They've got the metallic Fat Wreck Chords sound down. There's also elements of newer popular punk mixed in too.
--Punk Planet
Review #13
Makeshift3, a trio from the San Diego area, brags of influences that ranges from Pantera to Blink 182. And after listening to the new Fluorescent Black CD, one finds this personal assessment to be extremely accurate. In fact, the group often sounds a little schizophrenic at times from track to track. Although its sound is an ever-changing mishmash of styles, Makeshift3's lyrical focus is nevertheless staunchly spiritual. For instance, during the track "The Darkest Night Of The Soul" it sings, "The nails in your hands and the hammer in mine." Many of the lyrics on this CD are equally straightforward, even though titles like "Hiyayda Martian 3.0 Gold" and "Et Tu Agnaetus Copinious" are more than just a little odd. Lead vocals range from metallic screaming to puskishly snotty singing. Nevertheless, the three nice looking gentlemen pictures on the disc's artwork look more like IT geeks at the office, rather than Warped Tour warriors. In today's ever-hyphenating music scene, it's not uncommon to see bands (such at this one) that draw from relatively diverse musical inspirations. But Makeshift3 never fails to make all of its various influences play together well here.
--HM Magazine
Review #12
JOLLY:
I quote: "Although the group considers itself a Christian band, not all of the songs pertain to religion." So, if you want that, here it is. I ain't wastin' ink. It's expensive. But I will say this: Religion is just the very best way of not questioning authority not thinking. Good luck to yez, you're gonna need it since you don't do either of the two (very important) things. Oh I forgot, you don't need luck since you have GOD. Or Buddha. Or whatever it is. Again, good luck. (Damn, that's a lot of ink wasted. Oh well.) The last track is about, apparently, sex, which is another area where not making Q's and not thinking are de rigueur.

MAUREEN:
Should be the soundtrack to the Kenneth Copeland Hour. Even though it is Bible thumper music it is good. This band is a lot better than Cripple Kid.
Track 6 "Bumble Bug"
Sounds like something my therapist told me once when I got mad at my parents.
Track 9 "Angel's Wings"
Very Bible Thumper.
Track 11 "Rising Sin"
Why do all these songs sound the same?
Track 15 "Twinkle Fingermuffin"
The most f*cked up thing I've ever heard.

HOLMSTROM:
These guys are high school Christian punks. Christian punk is like straight edge taken to the extreme, right? I wonder what Osama Bin Laden would think of these guys? Would he think this is better, worse or the same as satanic heavy metal?
One problem with most Christian rock IMHO is there's no anger. These guys seem too satisfied with themselves. Like they have the answer to everyone else's problems. They never question authority. The lyrics are as boring and pointless as too much - well... as too much stuff that passes for punk nowadays. But there's a smugness about them. They're looking down on us from above. This sure isn't punk rock to me.
I have nothing against the Christian philosophy/religion - well, actually I do. In the current political climate I am burned out with religious fanatics of all types. But this record would suck whether it was by Christian punk or Satanic metalheads. The song lyrics are God-awful. They remind me of Joni Mitchell or CSN&Y. This is not punk rock. It's a travesty, and imitation, or a satire of punk. These guys wouldn't know punk if it kicked them in the ass. Their last song, "Twinkle Fingermuffins," is a disco song. And it's a good one! So do us all a favor, Makeshift 3, drop the punk rock pose and switch to disco. It's what you're best at. (Not that there's anything wrong with that!)

--punkmagazine.com 10/12/01
Review #11
After looking at one of the worst band websites I have honestly ever seen, I wasn't expecting much from listening to Makeshift3. Then after looking at the picture on the back of their album I was expecting a Blink 182/Good Charlotte rip-off but got something completely different. I have honestly never heard anything like these guys. They completely gel pop punk and hard core together and for them it works. "Et Tu Agnaetus Copinious"/"The Darkest Night of the Soul" starts the album off with metal guitars and the power pop style for drumming and shows the mixing of diversity on the album. "Irish Sky" is a 100% power punk song that sounds similar to a mix of Blink 182 meets True Doxology. "Nine Year Love Story" begins like a California Rock song and then quickly speeds up with touches of metal influence to then continue into a hard core song. The songs sometimes get confusing because so many elements falling on top of one another. "Cut, Poison, Burn" is a 100% straight up hard core number and this is where the band seems the most comfortable. Screaming guitars, hard driving bass lines filled the speakers as a breath of fresh air. "Locked Inside a Cell" was another interesting track mixing the various styles and influences of the band with hard breaking guitars but still a melodic punk feel at times. The rest of the tracks fall more into the metal influence but their is still that pop punk overtone with the chorus riffs and drumming. Overall, the CD was very unique and well produced but a bit confusing for the ears with so many different layers of style.
--Wise Men Promotions
Review #10
When I first heard these guys a few years ago on Mp3.com, I liked them, but wished they were a little harder-edged. Well, as the saying goes, be careful what you wish for because you just might get it. On this sophomore effort almost four years after their debut, Makeshift3 takes a dramatic turn towards the hard and heavy, while still keeping the core elements of their earlier material that made them a good band. The metal-edge technical guitar work on this CD, which reminds me of Strung-Out or Thrice, ride the crest between punk and metal, especially since they steer clear of solos. On top of their newer guitar sound, Makeshift3 has also mixed their traditional pop-punk style vocals with today's the ever popular screaming, especially over the choruses. Normally I would write a band off that resorts to this lame trend, however unlike most of their contemporaries, Makeshift3 change things up a bit by not including the screamo stuff on every song. Throw in the fact that these guys actually write good songs with clever melodies, bridges and catchy choruses, Fluorescent Black has both song and style, giving the band a little more broad appeal.
--PunkMusic.com
Review #9
MAKESHIFT3 nearly hit the junk heap when I opened the jewelcase of "Game Day" to find a quote from Galatians (is it trendy among these circles to find the most obscure book?) and a testimonial to the unseen hand of God. How about a simple "get off yer asses and be cool to each other"? I'll give 'em points for not hiding the Christian message and being upfront about what they are but I'm not buying the idea of an interactive Higher Power from anybody looking to cash a sawbuck on my internal discontents and these little Christian proselytizers can suck my ass. Their music, on the other hand, is almost good enough to get me to overlook the whiny cross-sucking lyrics. Get out your bushel-baskets, my wee bairns, and hide that goddamned light as if marauding Vikings were pillaging the sanctuary because you're in danger of combining the worst elements of whiny post-Nirvana grunge and Falwell-esque holier-than-thou-ness. But you do rock hard for white college kids who've never had to worry about a meal.
--Clint Darling, inmusicwetrust.com
Review #8
Mix in the intensity of Thrice with the catchiness of Blink 182, and you're just beginning to discover what the dynamic Makeshift3 is all about. The 13 songs found within are vibrant and infectious. Tunes such as The Darkest Night Of The Soul, Nine Year Love Story, Irish Sky, and Vilification In Outline are highlights, although repeated listening will make you mix and match your favorites. Originally based out of San Diego area, Makeshift3 has performed all over the country and have even participated on a few Warped Tour dates. If punk rock laced with hardcore inflections is your music of choice, then Fluorescent Black by Makeshift3 is destined to be found within the confines of your CD player for the months to come.
--Highwire Daze Magazine
Review #7
Makeshift3: Fluorescent Black

I knew it would eventually happen. I grab just about anything to review, but dammit, I got a Christian punk CD! I pop the thing in and think these guys sound like Avenged Sevenfold. Not half bad. Then I start looking at the credits and I see "Special Thanks: Lord & Savior Jesus Christ." I pulled that f*cker right out of the player and I am done.

--Don of the Dead (razorcake.org)
Review #6
Here we go - three piece wanna be Greenday/Blink 182 East Coast pop punk, they have mastered to a tee the art of the three chord song. Seen it all before, got the T-shirt. MxPx do it much better thank you very much. This band have obviously tried hard for this album has some amazing guitar parts in some songs once you get past the three chords. Also, it should be noted that these guys are great lyricsmiths with some seriously good work on offer here. It's just a shame the tunes are so unoriginal. But they are young and will learn given time though if truth be told there are better, more original Christian punk bands - even one in England (mentioning no names)...
--Marc Lungley
Review #5
Makeshift3: Fluorescent Black

I probably never would have heard of Makeshift3 if I'd never taken a chance on a random cassette I spotted on eBay so many years ago (seriously, it was the last cassette I ever bought!), and I've felt as if I've been tagging along for the ride with them ever since! I luv'd their light-hearted punk sound back then, but man, Man, MAN; Makeshift just completely blew me away with Fluorescent Black! Being a major hardcore fan I luv'd hearing the screams and breakdowns incorporated to what has now become an all-out Power-Punk/Screamo feel similar to bands like Comeback Kid and Inked In Blood. It was a HUGE pleasure to see an album bridge the gap between the 2 genres. I can't express how happy I am with it!

--Anonymous Amazon.com customer 8-5-05
Review #4
Makeshift3: Game Day

Makeshift3 is a pop/ punk group of 3, which began way back in 1995 in San Diego County. They state influences from Blink 182 to Pantera to the Foo Fighters and MxPx. And have played with groups like Slick Shoes, Dogwood, Project 86, PAX217, Hangnail, Noise Ratchet, and many more with articles in HM and CCM Magazines and some airplay on ESPN. Game Day is their nationally distributed 3rd release on Micah Records.
Makeshift3 definitely doesn't do anything to throw more dirt on punk's inevitable grave but also doesn't seem to help dig them out either. This is decent, well-produced music but nothing that we haven't already heard from MxPx and many more alike. For the avid punk fan, I would suggest picking this up this 15-track 47-minute deal but for someone looking for something fresh, look further. One note, though, is track 15, "Twinkie Fingermuffins," which is pure genius showing that Makeshift3 definitely has a lot more to offer; just not right now.

--Blake Garris (Jesus Freak Hideout) 6-18-02
Review #3
Makeshift3: Game Day

Don't feel bad if you've never heard of a punk band called Makeshift 3. Game Day is only their second album and is found more often than not within the strict confines of Christian music stores, a place even devout Christians visit infrequently. Contrary to what you might be thinking, the trio doesn't use this album as an opportunity to preach Jesus into your life under the guise of pop punk. Rather, Christianity is what they're about and they're not afraid to show it. The lyrics are thoughtful and the songs catchy. Listen to "Circus," where their fast pace signature is offset by restrained vocals. Unfortunately, I don't think Game Day will reach the large audience that it deserves because religion is such touchy subject matter.

--Ryan Mungia
Review #2
Makeshift3: Fluorescent Black
I guess looks aren't everything.

From the look of the album -- the bright pink color scheme and happy and goofy (and short hair-styled) band picture on the back -- I was expecting some pleasant pop-punk. I could go for a happy, positive band after all the tough guy posturing and gloomy long-haired emo I come across these days. I could go for double-time beats, major keys, and I could do without the screaming and silly paint-by-numbers breakdowns.

Makeshift3 immediately prove that looks aren't everything, and after a pleasing double-time intro with a dark Strung Out feel, they succumb to the pressure of screaming and breakdowns in the first full track "The Darkest Night of the Soul."

This is their fourth album since their inception in 1995 but it's the first I've heard, so I can't compare with their past material. But here on Fluorescent Black, half the time they sound like Blink as on the poppy "Nine Year Love Story," and I am down with that until the unnecessary screaming at the end ("I wanna be right by your siiiiiide!") and a guitar solo that tries to be showy but never seems to land on the right note. Then all of a sudden they sound like a different band, continuing onto the next track, "Cut, Poison, Burn" with its chugging palm-muted rhythms, guitar harmonics, and hideous screams. It's obvious these guys wear their influences on their sleeve, and as I check out their bio I find Blink-182, of course, as well as New Found Glory, along with harsher bands like Pantera and Thrice. "Six Hours to Phoenix" has a bunch of elements that remind me of "First Date" or some other Blink song, but then they have to throw some screaming in there too.

Evidently these guys are a Christian band too, but I wouldn't hold them against them. They seem like good fellas and they don't beat you over the head with it, in fact, I didn't realize this was their thing until I read an article included with their press materials. Not until closer "Hiyayda Martian 3.0 Gold" (whatever that means) did I hear a more obvious reference -- "Because if you're here with me / God's here with us / That's all that counts." Not a big deal, for me at least.

They make a decent attempt at mixing their favorite genres, but sometimes it's a shock. Some of the breakdowns and metal guitar stylings are pretty decent and they almost had me convinced that that is what they do best. But for the most part, I think they should focus on the punk side, because screaming is way too trendy. Fluorescent Black is definitely a strong showing of polished punk rock, the product of high school friends who have honed their skills over time to become a tight unit.

--Punknews.org August 8, 2006
Review #1
Makeshift3: Fluorescent Black

Makeshift3, a trio from the San Diego area, brags of influences that range from Pantera to Blink 182. And after listening to the new Fluorescent Black CD, one finds this personal assessment to be extremely accurate. In fact, the group often sounds a little schizophrenic at times from track to track. Although its sound is an ever-changing mishmash of styles, Makeshift3's lyrical focus is nevertheless staunchly spiritual. For instance, during the track "The Darkest Night of the Soul" it sings, "The nails in your hands and the hammer in mine." Many of the lyrics on this CD are also equally straightforward, even though titles like "Hiyayda Martian 3.0 Gold" and "Et Tu Agnaetus Copinious" are more than just a little odd. Lead vocals range from metallic screaming to punkishly snotty singing. Nevertheless, the three nice looking gentlemen pictured on the disc's artwork look more like IT geeks at the office, rather than Warped Tour warriors. In today's ever-hyphenating music scene, it's not uncommon to see bands (such as this one) that draw from relatively diverse music inspirations. But Makeshift3 never fails to make all of its various influences play together well here.

--Dan Macintosh (HM Magazine) Nov/Dec 2005