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Corrido de Jose' Maria Tresierra
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Historical 'Corrido' of the early days on the Wst Coast of the US and Canada.
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Bodie
2007
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Tue Nov 20, 2007
Country : Country and Western
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» highest in charts:   # 4   (68,632 songs currently listed in Country)
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About the song
A Campfire Tale From The Caribou Trail
Mike Puhallo

The old time cowboys west of the Rockies differed in many ways from those on the Eastern slope. Their tack and methods of handling cattle and horses were acquired from the Vaqueros of California, who began to come north at least forty years before cattle began to move out of Texas toward Montana. The influence of the Vaquero is still evident throughout the ranch lands of the Pacific Northwest.

The old time cowboys west of the Rockies differed in many ways from those on the Eastern slope. Their tack and methods of handling cattle and horses were acquired from the Vaqueros of California, who began to come north at least forty years before cattle began to move out of Texas toward Montana. The influence of the Vaquero is still evident throughout the ranch lands of the Pacific Northwest.

In my poem I use the French pronunciation of Nez Perce' Which is like: nay-pur-say, with the accents on the first and last syllables. I was not sure how an old vaquero from Sonora would pronounce a French name.

Some members of the Tressierra family here today claim that Jose' was a Spaniard who came here by way of Mexico. My father used to know his son Pablo, who was known to loudly and proudly proclaim "I Am A Mexican Gentleman!" if anyone ever mistook him for an Indian... Jose' worked as a packer and freighter for quite a few years then he and Pablo established a Ranch just south of Williams Lake BC. right beside his old friend Raphael Valenzuela. Valenzuela's Ranch at Dog Creek is the second oldest recorded deed in the Cariboo Region. Another friend and fellow freighter, Jesus Garcia is credited with establishing the very first ranch in the Nicola Valley (about 60 miles south of Kamloops)

They pushed cattle north to Barkerville in 1863 at the height of the Cariboo gold rush Barkerville was the biggest town west of Chicago and north of San Francisco.
Next year will mark 150 years since the start of the Cariboo gold rush and the establishment of the crown colony of British Columbia.
In 1821, The Hudson Bay Company began buying cattle out of California to supply their Forts in what are now Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, but was then all known as the Oregon Territory.





Packing was an occupation that rewarded innate qualities and paid little regard to status or civility. In the early years most of those in the pack crews were Mexicans, with some Chileans and other Spanish Americans. In June 1859 the secretary of the British boundary commission commented in his diary, `You must first of all understand that all of our muleteers & packers are Mexicans.' A year later, in June 1860, the Anglican Bishop of Victoria, the Rev. George Hills, traveling from Yale to Lillooet, recorded talking `to Mexicans who are the muleteers of the country'. The make-up of the work force is in no way surprising. These nationalities had dominated packing in both California and the Oregon Territory during the gold rush. Many men simply moved north when the British Columbia boom began. The size of the new finds attracted packers directly from Spanish America. Pancho Gutierrez and his two brothers arrived at Victoria by steamer from Mexico. Some of these men did not stay long or did not survive. Others contracted a union with Aboriginal women and put down roots in British Columbia. The descendants of Manuel Alvarez, Jesus Garcia, Pancho Gutierrez and Jose Maria Tresierra - to name but four of these early packers - can be found across the province to this day.
Siskiyou Trail: The Hudson's Bay Company Route to California
By Richard H. Dillon
Nez Perce and cattle herds
Lyrics
Jose’ Tressierras

My name is Jose’ Tressierra
Best bull-whacker on the Caribou Trail
My wife Josefina and son Pablo
Wait for me at my cabin in Yale

I am a man your history has forgotten
But amigos I have seen it all
Since I left my home in Sonora
Where only mesquite and saguaro grow tall

I walked to the San Joaquin Valley
When I was a skinny young lad
To learn the ways of the Vaquero
I rode all the best horses they had

When Mcloud came south to buy cattle
For Douglas the Hudson Bay boss
We drove a thousand wild cows from the la barranca
North to the Columbia and across

Valenzuela and I rode with a herd to the Snake River
Land of the Great Nez Perce
We wintered our herds on the bunch grass
Tapadero high all the way

Los Indios son muy buen caballeros
But they did not know much about cows
The Scotchmen were sabe’ about cattle
But as horsemen were lacking somehow

So it was that we stayed on to teach them
What a riate and a spade-bit were for
Besides since the Gringos had stolen California
I had no reason to ride south anymore

So when the Caribou was crawling with miners
With many hungry bellies to fill
Valenzuela and I gathered a herd
And pushed north up to Barkerville

Valenzuela now he is a rancher
He will chase cows all of his life
Me I haul freight on this rocky goat track
To make a home for my pretty young wife

But this evening I will work on a bosal
The new riata and mecate’ are done
On the wall of my shack hangs a tree
On the saddle I will build for my son

When my Pablo is a little bit taller
I will take him out hunting for strays
In those wild bench lands west of the Fraser
I will teach him the Vaquero ways